SHE'S A NEW
GRANDMOTHER.

Could she potentially harm the baby?

The answer is "YES", if she has pertussis.

A study has shown that approximately 85% of infants who contracted pertussis got it from their immediate or extended family.1*

According to the CDC, a single dose of Tdap is recommended for adults who may have close contact with an infant <1 year of age, including parents, grandparents, childcare providers, and healthcare providers, if it has not been previously received.2

This is one important way you can reduce the risk of infecting infants too young to be vaccinated for pertussis—those who are at greatest risk for severe pertussis, including possible hospitalization and death.2

In fact, 1 in 300 infants <12 months of age who contracted pertussis in 2016 died.3

However, despite the risk and CDC recommendations, the pertussis vaccination rate for adults 19 years of age and older in the U.S. is just 23%.4†‡

*When the source of infection could be identified.

41.9% among adults living with an infant <1 year old.

From 2005 to 2015.

CDC Tdap Recommendations

The following recommendations are excerpted from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)-recommended adolescent and adult immunization schedules. This excerpt does not represent the entirety of the recommendations for vaccination with Tdap.

The ACIP recommends:

Age 11-18 years: Adolescents 11-18 years of age who have not been previously vaccinated with Tdap should receive a single dose of Tdap5

Age ≥19 years: All adults 19 years of age and older who have not been previously vaccinated with Tdap should receive a single dose of Tdap6

Pregnant women should receive 1 dose of Tdap during each pregnancy, preferably during the early part of gestational weeks 27-36, regardless of prior history of receiving Tdap6

 

CDC=Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Tdap=tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis.

Help protect the whole family

References: 1. Skoff TH, Kenyon C, Cocoros N, et al. Sources of infant pertussis infection in the United States. Pediatrics. 2015;136(4):635-641. 2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Surveillance of vaccination coverage among adult populations—United States, 2014. MMWR. 2016;65(1):1-36. 3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2016 Provisional Pertussis Surveillance Report. https://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/downloads/pertuss-surv-report-2016-provisional.pdf. Accessed October 6, 2017. 4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vaccination coverage among adults in the United States, National Health Interview Survey, 2015. www.cdc.gov/vaccines/imz-managers/coverage/adultvaxview/coverage-estimates/2015.html. Updated February 7, 2017. Accessed August 22, 2017. 5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommended immunization schedule for children and adolescents aged 18 years or younger, United States, 2017. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/child/0-18yrs-child-combined-schedule.pdf. Accessed October 5, 2017. 6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommended immunization schedule for adults aged 19 years or older, United States, 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/adult/adult-combined-schedule.pdf. Updated February 1, 2017. Accessed August 4, 2017.

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